Search
categories
CB2 tweets
Friday
Jun252010

pride parades, 2010

photo courtesy of: terry6082booksWhat: Chicago Annual Pride Parade 2010
When: 12:00 noon, Sunday, June 27th
Where
: north on Halsted from Belmont to Irving Park, then south on Broadway to Diversey

What: New York City Pride Parade 2010
When
: 12:00 noon, Sunday, June 27th
Where
: south on 5th from 36th to 9th street, then southwest to Greenwich Street

What: San Francisco Pride Parade 2010
When
: 10:30 am, Sunday, June 27th
Where
: southwest on Market Street from Beale to 8th Street

CB2 Lincoln ParkWhether you’re staking a claim for a front row seat or in the lineup to show support, break out the SPF 30 for nationwide Pride Parades this Sunday, June 27th!

Chicago’s theme for 2010—suggested by InterPride, the international Pride organization—is “One Heart, One World, One Pride” while San Francisco’s theme is “Forty and Fabulous!” marking the 40th anniversary of their parade.

New York’s theme is closer to home: “Paint the Town Ruby—Stonewall 40”. This being the 40th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and rubies being the gemstone of a fortieth anniversary— not to mention the signature shoes of Judy Garland who passed soon after the riots—it’s a match made in Pride heaven.

Since 2000, June’s been declared Pride Month, so celebrate diversity and March On!

CB2 SohoCB2 Union Square

Thursday
Jun242010

recipe: white wine sangria

1 bottle of chardonnay
1/2 cup triple sec
1/4 cup brandy
1-1/2 cups club soda
1/8 cup sugar
slices of oranges, lemons, limes and green grapes

Mix and chill everything—except the club soda—an hour before serving.
Serve over ice and add club soda right before serving—or put on the side to top off.

hint: Reserve some fruit to garnish and drink carefully—it goes down like fruit juice especially when it’s blazing hot!

Tuesday
Jun222010

in multiples: mirrors

Similar to assembly lines from the industrial revolution, repetition of the same object is synonymous with modern. Simple shapes create a geometry and attract the eye because of their linear flow.

To create drama, mirrors in multiples will give the biggest bang for the buck—not only do they enhance the energy in a room, they visually increase space and light.

Monday
Jun212010

designer profile: noël ashby

Where was your favorite place to live?
I’m quite happy where I am now so I’d have to say Chicago is my favorite place to live. It has character, grit, lots of trees, the lake, and it is a great place to make things.

What’s your favorite room in your home?
My favorite room in my home is without question my studio. I spend most of my time there, surrounded by things and possibilities: visuals, tools, wire, fabric, and the like—to me it’s wonderful.

As a child I used to dig around in my Dad’s home office and I was amazed at all of the things he had—paper clips, a stapler, pads of papers, and there were specific places to keep all of this great bounty. I now have the same, just on a larger scale.

What are your interests outside of design?
I like people a lot, and most activities involving people… music, art, food. I’m also quite fond of tinkering around with things, walking my dog Hank, going to yoga, or going to see or do something that I’ve never done before. This latter usually involves snacks.

Who are your design icons?
There are so, so many both past and present, and across all disciplines: music, art, and fashion as well as design. I always love seeing what Hella Jongerius is up to or what the Bouroullec brothers are doing.

Your personal decorating style is _____?
Spare but personal. Most things out in my home or up on the walls have meaning to me… be it hammer heads I found at a garage sale, artwork, my Grandmother’s ceramics, or a stack of washers that I know someday are destined to become something else.

Form vs. function?
One is reliant upon the other.

What was/is your biggest indulgence?
Just one?

What’s your favorite element/possession?
I’m quite attached to most of the things I surround myself with but home is never home to me until the hammer heads are up.

Do you have one low budget decorating tip?
Besides color or a beautiful lack of color, almost anything hung up in multiples becomes interesting and if it happens to be something you really like, well, all the better.

To see all of Noël’s current designs for CB2, go here.

Thursday
Jun172010

material world: flatware

photo by: saintpo2007Knives are the oldest and most basic of all kitchen utensils. Primitive utility knives were used for almost everything—to hunt and harvest, chop and carve. It was the most important tool anyone could own because of its usefulness.

Not surprisingly, the more one could afford the more ornate the knife. Being so readily available, wood handled versions were the least expensive. Ivory and horn were as prized as trophies and often uniquely carved. But all metal versions were the most expensive using only precious metals. Typically they were monogrammed to identify the proud owner.

Not too far behind, spoons developed as diets evolved. And last, the fork started as a simple two tined—or pronged—utensil used to dig into bones or shells for meat or to rescue it from the cooking fire. Eventually three and four tined versions became standard since they performed better.

As wealth increased in middle and upper classes, homes increased in comfort and home goods were made to address specific tasks. Knives remained prized possessions over other utensils often being stored under lock and key in sturdy wooden boxes to guard against thievery. Typical flatware sets consisted of only simple forks and spoons since knives were custom.

photo by: geishaboy500

At the height of the Victorian era, dinner courses soared from one to as many as ten and etiquette declared that no foods should be picked up by the fingers so placesettings could include fish knives, berry spoons or lettuce forks.

Spoons became as varied as today’s wine glass shapes with different versions for bouillon and gumbo. Luncheons required their own unique, often smaller, utensils including spoons specific to sugar, various teas and coffees which were being imported from exotic faraway lands.

After the 1920s, as wealth and luxury were checked by economics, efficient mass production and everyday life with less hired help all joined to give rise to the modern 5-piece placesetting.

As new production techniques were developed, silverplating became popular for everyday use while sterling is still for special occasions or formal entertaining. Markings of 18/10 or 18/8 stainless steel refer to the amount of chromium and nickel included. For example, flatware stamped 18/8 combines 18% chromium for durability and hardness with 8% nickel for shine and luster. Lastly, a shiny or matte look is achieved in the final processes by either polishing or brushing the metal.

CB2 pattern 518 flatware

For Cloud Gate, Anish Kapoor’s first public outdoor sculpture in the US, steel plates were riveted to a frame then polished to a mirror finish hiding the joints.