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Entries in artwork (2)

Wednesday
May292013

how it's made: ariel beads artwork

Artist Ariel Erestingcol’s process of reconstructing an image is rendered through the meticulous placement of colorful beads. While some beads arrive separated by color, mixed bags have to be separated by hand, further intensifying the process. Every so often his dog will get excited and knock over a bucket of beads so he’s grateful his nephews sometimes sort them on weekends—but Ariel says he still finds them all over the studio.

Once the beads are organized, an image is pixelated and then transferred to a mosaic filter, which creates a map for the placement of the colored beads—including some “glow in the dark” beads which were used for their color but technically they should emit a faint glow in the right circumstances.

These depictions of New York—in ariel times square taxi beads and ariel times square beads—are made up of over 5000 beads—each making one pixel of the digitized image and representing one unit of understanding. Through this process, the piece is given incremental meaning and its fractured nature attempts to create meaning of everyday events.

When the image is complete, it’s pressed with heat so the beads fuse together and mounted onto an MDF panel—the corners of which are routed to mimic the curved edges of the beads—and a hanging mechanism is added to the back which also creates a shadow lift and further adding dimension.

These numbered pieces are truly limited since they cannot be remade in the same colors—some are now discontinued—and requiring hours and hours of focus and intent, these limited-edition prints have a release of 75 each.

Tuesday
Jul052011

one of a finds: birds on a wire

Reclaimed Douglas fir planks, harvested from old abandoned buildings in Southern California, find their way home in wood “prints” inked with abstract birds silhouetted high on cable wires by artist Parvez Taj.

Documenting the history of each building and the source of each timber, he selects planks which are then hand-assembled and printed with eco-friendly, UV-cured inks.

Weathered and distressed, each birds on a wire print is evidence of the concept of beauty as rendered by the elements of nature over time. In his waste-to-energy initiative, Taj’s mission is to create art with minimal impact on the environment.

Why birds? In the artist’s words, “Birds have the ultimate freedom.”

One of a Finds original works are offered one time only as a limited edition for collectors and enthusiasts—birds on a wire has a fall 2011 release of 200.