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Entries in bar (5)

Monday
Jul132015

fall favorites: sandra

city slicker pedestals
They’re great for so many rooms, nooks, hallways…. outstanding construction, proportions, and a beautiful finish to showcase treasures I’ve hauled back from faraway places.
tux ice bucket
Most of my condo is 70s mod and
this ice bucket will be right at home
on the bar.
stamp runner
Gere Kavanaugh has been a joy to work with—I’ve been lucky to have had many delightful conversations with her over the years—and this sophisticated runner will go anywhere, anytime.

Wednesday
Jul012015

summer sips + styling by little miss party

When summer gives us lemons… we call our friends at Little Miss Party, NYC-based party and event planners, to share 4 fun ways to make and serve lemonade all summer long!

Classic Lemonade Recipe:
1. Add 4 cups of fresh squeezed lemon juice and then fill the rest of the dispenser with ice cold water—leaving 2-3 inches from the top.
2. Add Sugar to taste.
3. Add ice and lemon slices before serving.

Styling Tips:
1. Acrylic outdoor glasses are the best for avoiding glass breakage.
2. Pretty paper straws will make everyone’s drink more festive.
3. A bright colored watering can makes for a cool looking vase for fresh flowers.
4. DIY Tip: paint a wood crate in an ombre pattern by mixing a solid color with white paint until you reach your desired shades. Use as a riser to prop your beverage dispenser on top of for easy serving.

Berry-infused Lemonade Recipe:
1. Fill the glass dispenser with lemonade and plenty of ice.
2. Add tons of fresh or frozen berries.

Styling Tips:
1. Set out a few pre-poured glasses so guests can grab when they arrive.
2. We used the stainless steel snack bowl as a vase for peonies that we picked from the garden.
3. Set out a bunch of mint for guests to add to their drinks if they wish.

Fruit-ade Recipe:
1. Fill glass beakers with lemonade.
2. Add sliced fruit—such as berries, peaches, whatever’s in season—and let the drinks infuse for at least one hour before serving.

Styling Tips:
1. Use a planter as an ice bucket for chilling wine or sparkling water to top off your drinks with—before filling with ice, line the planter with a slightly smaller bowl, food safe plastic wrap or parchment paper—and don’t forget the ice tongs!
2. Use a watering can to fill with a bunch of mint for a fresh smell and unexpected look on your bar—again, line the inside of the can or drop in a small drinking glass.
3. The black cake stand is perfect for propping up the beakers to give height to the table.

Fresh Herb Lemonade Recipe:
1. Fill with a mix of lemonade, ice cold water, ice
and lemon slices.
2. Set out cups of herbs for guests to add to their drinks. We used rosemary, mint and thyme.

Styling Tips:
1. We used the stainless steel snack bowls to fill with lemons for a bright pop of color on our bar.
2. A black cake stand props up the beverage dispenser for easy serving.
3. And a glass beaker doubles as a vase for fresh flowers from the garden.

Friday
Dec192014

favorite gifts: sandra

handy gold caddy
it’s perfect for so many places, spaces and stuff — the desk / office, kitchen, even tools.
ai bud vases
for my friends who love to garden, spending time outdoors—or is this one for me? it’s also tempting to
stick a candle in them and do the Chianti bottle with wax drippings thing…hmmm…
gold pig bookends
ever since they were photographed in the kitchen holding cookbooks, I’ve been wanting them for all my foodie-friends—who doesn’t think everything is better with bacon?

Friday
Sep192014

redefined: das beer can

photo by: LaModaLisa photo by: cgrutt

The idea of drinking beer from something other than a ceramic stein or glass mug poured from the tap at the local public house or pub, was first considered over 100 years ago in 1909. Like many innovations, the technology existed but it took about 25 years—and the repeal of Prohibition—for the modest beer can to catch on.

In 1933, the first canned ale was tested in Virginia—needless to say, consumers welcomed the change which paved the way for easy-to-transport, easy-to-store, disposable cans. Initially made of steel with a flat top, they required a sharp opener, or church key, to pierce triangular openings—one to drink from, and another on the opposite side which allowed air into the can to improve the pour out.

The evolution to lightweight aluminum was inevitable due to the drawbacks of steel—not only was a lining required to protect the contents, steel is inherently prone to rust and the heavier weight meant transportation costs were higher than necessary.

photo by: Mark photo by: Amara

photo by: mark gallagher photo by: Paul Flannery

Easy-to-use pull tabs replaced the need to keep an opener handy—but they also heralded an increase in emergency room visits as the sharp edges cut fingers and feet or, in worst-case scenarios, drinkers choked on the tab they’d kept safe in the can. Today, wide mouth openings created by attached tabs are the norm—but as small brews flourish, the capped bottle is seeing a revival.

In the meantime, das can reminds us of modest old-school beers—not to mention beer can collections and Oktoberfest which starts this weekend—Zum Wohl!

photo by: Steve Jurvetson

Wednesday
Jul182012

recipe: brandy wine punch

2 bottles of sparkling wine, chilled
1 L chilled club soda
1-1/2 C brandy
1-1/2 C Amontillado sherry
1 C fresh lemon juice
1/2 C superfine sugar
1/4 C Cointreau
1/4 C Ruby port
ice cubes
orange and lemon slices for garnish

Directions:
1. In a large punch bowl, add the sugar to the lemon juice and stir until it dissolves.

2. Add the remaining liquids and stir gently.

3. Add ice, garnish with fruit and serve.