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Entries in craft (7)

Wednesday
May292013

how it's made: ariel beads artwork

Artist Ariel Erestingcol’s process of reconstructing an image is rendered through the meticulous placement of colorful beads. While some beads arrive separated by color, mixed bags have to be separated by hand, further intensifying the process. Every so often his dog will get excited and knock over a bucket of beads so he’s grateful his nephews sometimes sort them on weekends—but Ariel says he still finds them all over the studio.

Once the beads are organized, an image is pixelated and then transferred to a mosaic filter, which creates a map for the placement of the colored beads—including some “glow in the dark” beads which were used for their color but technically they should emit a faint glow in the right circumstances.

These depictions of New York—in ariel times square taxi beads and ariel times square beads—are made up of over 5000 beads—each making one pixel of the digitized image and representing one unit of understanding. Through this process, the piece is given incremental meaning and its fractured nature attempts to create meaning of everyday events.

When the image is complete, it’s pressed with heat so the beads fuse together and mounted onto an MDF panel—the corners of which are routed to mimic the curved edges of the beads—and a hanging mechanism is added to the back which also creates a shadow lift and further adding dimension.

These numbered pieces are truly limited since they cannot be remade in the same colors—some are now discontinued—and requiring hours and hours of focus and intent, these limited-edition prints have a release of 75 each.

Friday
Jan182013

influencers: susie daly

“I think our modern pieces make our home more contemporary and more well-rounded. I love the thrill of finding a vintage score, or a really special DIY item—but I also love finding something brand new to add to the mix.”
Susie Daly, Renegade Craft Fair Co-Founder and Director

Would you describe yourself as a “renegade”?
I’d describe myself as someone who likes to live life off the beaten path and according to my own terms. So in that way, I guess I do consider myself a renegade.

What words sum up your personal aesthetic?
Modern rustic.

Your home is filled with special objects that resonate with you on a personal level. How do the CB2 pieces you have “speak to you”?
Everything I chose has a clean and modern look, but has a rustic feel about it—such as the red bench, the kitchen chairs and the white cuckoo clock. I love that the materials of the wood and the wire feel rustic and warm, but the design is contemporary.

What’s the balance for you between vintage, thrift, DIY and modern?
I’d say it’s a pretty even mix. Our furniture is about half modern, half vintage pieces. Our home decor, such as pillows, lamps, rugs, is a good mix of vintage/DIY/modern. But I’d say almost all of our artwork is one-of-a-kind or small-edition pieces.

Thanks Susie—let us know when you have that garage sale!

Personal Collection:
Susie is always scouring antique stores and the Renegade Craft Fair for unique items. Personal finds here include vintage kitchen table, red desk chair and globe; brown cuckoo clock she handcrafted with her husband, Mat Daly; wall art and found objects. More info at renegadecraft.com.

Friday
Oct262012

how it's made: beaded bracelets

Bawa La Tumaini in Kenya, which translates to ‘Wing of Hope’ in English, is a Fair-Trade company which finances the purchase of raw materials, pays creative women and men fair wages to produce products such as baskets and jewelry, and provides links to global markets to sell their handicrafts.

Produced by a group of 15 women and men, in one of the Nairobi’s informal settlements, they specialize in making handicrafts based on Maasai bead jewellry—necklaces, wrist bands, friendship bands, and anklets.

Their main market has been through local sales in Nairobi but unfortunately, they have not been sustainable—in this African setting the nuclear family supports the extended family.

Different age groups wear different styles, designs and colors of beaded pieces—but women decide the styles to create. This limited quantity purchase will translate into colorful gifts that give on in the way of access to healthcare facilities, food and clean drinking water.

Monday
Aug132012

how it's made: shesham tools

Designed by a vegetarian who loves to cook—and who possesses a wooden spoon collection spanning decades—these handmade, sustainable shesham tools have subtle details that both casual and advanced cooks can appreciate.

First, the shesham spoon was originally referred to as the marinara spoon since other family members aren’t vegetarian and frequent dinner invitees love all kinds of chilies, stews and marinara sauces. These types of dishes are usually prepared in deeper pots, so the spoon features a longer handle and a wider bowl to stir more with less work—or attention while the cook visits with guests.

The shesham server and spatula—while great for serving up grilled homemade pizza with their precisely angled surfaces—can also be used for scrambling eggs, flipping chorizo or sauteing onions. Bonus: wooden tools are more gentle on pots and pans than metal utensils and sculptural side curves provide maximum mixing and reach into the corners of bowls and pots.

The shesham salad servers not only serve leafy greens, but they’re also designed to catch diced vegetables and scoop up salad dressings which otherwise seem to pool on the bottom of the bowl.

Hints: rinsing is better than scrubbing—use mild soap as needed—and never put them in a dish- washer. Normal use should maintain their condition, but a rub of oil can restore their rich appearance.

Thursday
Oct142010

how to: make a bubble wreath

In our latest catalog, our creative stylists used clear glass bubble balls to create modern wall art in the form of a wreath. While ours was made to appear permanently installed in the room, these instructions allow for temporary or Holiday decorating.

Supplies:
1. space on a wall that can be nailed, or a flat MDF board sized appropriately
2. pencil and string
3. 3” nails and a hammer
4. bubble balls—a mixture of 4” and 6” sizes
5. optional for the MDF: paint as desired and hanging hardware
hint: always contact your local hardware store for advice on which hanging hardware is appropriate for your wall art and walls.

Directions:
1. Measure to find the center of the wall area—or MDF board—intended to display the wreath. Connect that point to a pencil and draw a perfect circle.

2. Roughly following the circle, positioning nails slightly inside and outside the circle, hammer in nails at least 1/2”.

3. Check position by temporarily placing a few bubble balls on the nails for a visual.

4. Complete nailing and place bubble balls as desired—starting with large ones first and fill in with smaller ones.
hint hint: if installing temporarily, hang the board once all nails are secured—without the bubble balls for safety reasons—then add the bubble balls.