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Entries in food (16)

Wednesday
Aug102011

recipe: pistachio and pecan crusted rack of lamb

3 fully trimmed racks of lamb (about 1-1/2 lbs each)
3 tblsp extra virgin olive oil
1/4 C dijon mustard
1/3 C pistachios, chopped
1/3 C pecans, chopped
1/4 C panko breadcrumbs
2 tblsp unsalted butter, melted
2 tblsp rosemary, minced
1 tblsp chives, thinly sliced
salt and pepper to taste
Serves 6-8

Directions:
Preheat oven to 375°F. Season each rack of lamb with salt and pepper and set aside.

Pour the oil in a large pan over medium-high heat and sear each rack for 3 to 4 minutes on each side.

Place each rack, bone side down, on a shallow baking sheet and brush the tops of each with a generous amount of mustard and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine the pistachios, pecans, panko, melted butter, rosemary, chives, salt and pepper and toss together until fully thoroughly combined. Cover the racks with the nut mixture and press the tops firmly ensuring the mixture will stick.

Place the racks in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes or until the tops have lightly browned and the meat is pink in the center.

Allow the racks to cool slightly—about 7 to 10 minutes—before slicing and serving.

Adam’s hints:
—remove the lamb from the fridge about 25-30 minutes before you cook it. This takes the chill off and helps for a more even cooking.
—cook lamb to an internal temp of 120° for rare and and 130° for medium.
—don’t forget: the temp will continue to rise after you remove it from the oven.

Monday
Aug082011

fat cat bar

In Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, check out Fat Cat Bar. Stop in soon so you don’t miss their refreshing summer cocktails—especially the Uptown Lemonade and Hi-Hat.

Beyond cocktails, wine and beer, they serve appetizers, brunch and dinner—think corn doggys, reuben balls, mancakes, a Thanksgiving Day sandwich—and don’t go home at 3am on a Saturday night without some of their homemade spicey vinegar.

Thanks to seth, lincoln park sales, for this submission.

Monday
Jun202011

watch: heritage radio network

In March of 2009, Patrick Martins and Heritage Foods USA started broadcasting the Heritage Radio Network out of two re-purposed shipping containers.

Located in the back garden of Roberta’s Restaurant in Bushwick, Brooklyn, the station regularly broadcasts over 20 shows focused on food and sustainability.

Featuring in-depth information and conversations from a variety of viewpoints, topics range from gardening to farming, from culinary techniques to financial advice, with a dash of architecture and music.

First, get your hands dirty when The Farm Report hosts talk to farmers across the country; and Greenhorn Radio is ‘by farmers for farmers’ with reports from farming communities painting a picture of the day-to-day life and struggles within the agricultural community.

Next, there’s We Dig Plants—all about gardening and landscape design—and At the Root of It which travels through the world of wine.

There are specials and mini-series for singular topics while A Taste of the Past, gets into the whys and the ways we eat—a look at how food is integral to our culture, our history—and their effects on present food trends.

Take a trip through the foodways of the United States—whether its about southern cooking or food policies—in Hot Grease and experience Brooklyn Eats by taking audio culinary tours throughout NY.

Flash Talks Cash helps explain the financials of opening or running small businesses—as well as managing personal finances—and Burning Down the House is the only weekly show that discusses architecture, design, and the built environment.

And last but not least, The Main Course talks up the food supply chain—from farmer to processor, from distributor to chef—all the way to a plate at home, in a restaurant, or a brown bag at the office. And The Food Seen is a well blended cocktail of food and art—which brings from behind the scenes to the forefront—photographers and artists that make your mouth water with crisp, colorful imagery.

Check their schedule for the next Snacky Tunes and don’t miss iTunes podcasts of all these shows—and Cutting the Curd as its host talks all things cheese.

Thursday
Mar242011

vertical woolly pocket herb garden how-to

During our summer catalog shoot, our stylists created a woolly pocket vertical herb garden
or pantry for a foodie!

We used fernleaf lavender ‘lavandula pinnata’ and two types of rosemary—‘rosmarinus tuscan blue’ and ‘rosmarinus prostratus’—but any preferred herb or edible flower should work
just fine.

For instructions on how-to create a large woolly pocket vertical garden, go here.

Thanks to curtis and april, CB2 catalog, for making us look so good!

Monday
Mar212011

meet us: adam pearson

Meet Adam Pearson, a professional food stylist based near our photo shoot in LA and Palm Springs. He’s the creative genius of our Mexican Fiesta and his recipes will be featured throughout the season.

Who taught you to cook?
Growing up in southern California, my dad spent a lot of time with me grilling outside. He also taught me how to make biscuits and sausage gravy when I was about 8. The gravy recipe is so easy its ingrained in my memory—and those moments became more special as our family split up.

Has ‘California cuisine’ influenced you?
I was exposed to a lot of different, exotic cultures and cuisines at a young age—ironically none from my own family. I took bits and pieces from friends’ homes and what they were cooking, and now as an adult they finally make sense when I mix them together in the kitchen.

What’s your favorite ingredient to cook with?
Spices. I love the flavor of ethnic foods but right now I’m obsessed with Korean. It’s warm, spicy, filling—very much like comfort food. I’m working with an assistant who goes to the Korean market with me, translates the staples, shares how they can be mixed—this opened a door to experimenting with Korean cuisine.

Got any food styling secrets you can share?
Instead of following a recipe, I’ll start by ‘deconstructing’ it—meaning I’ll cook ingredients so each looks its best. As for plating, I like them to look approachable…a little messy…perfectly imperfect.

Also, tools are my thing. I’m the tool kid. I’d be lost without a blow torch…a mandolin…but the most important tools are a sense of confidence and your hands. It’s so true that experience enhances your senses. The first food stylist I apprenticed under—all he needed was his fingers and spit.

Where do you find inspiration?
My partner Matt and I, we travel a lot and always bring something back that’s food related. Our first stop is usually a grocery store for local ingredients—like chick pea flour from Nice, France. Matt was recently in Singapore and brought back a suitcase and a half—our pantry is filled with international foodstuffs.

We like to shop for one-off serving dishes, special baking dishes made for indigenous recipes…in Spain we found local pottery shops with hand-made, lovely cazuelas which are very useful in preparing Spanish recipes.

And wherever we are, we’re dissecting and cataloging what was prepared for us. In Buenos Aires we had compound butters with fresh bread that was to die for! Like English muffins with pistachio butter—so easy to do at home.

What do you do for fun?
Matt publishes mattbites.com, and we often work on it together, so recipes, food styling and photography are a huge part of both our lives. There’s no way around bringing our work home with us—especially since his studio is part of the house.

Often one of us is on a shoot out of town, so when we’re both home we make lots of trips to farmer’s markets. It’s almost a cliche but we get what’s local and seasonal—we’re spoiled being in southern California where we get fresh vegetables all year. We go without a menu in mind, check out what looks good, and make things up as we go along.

Great looking plates, platters, and serving utensils add another layer. Dinner in our house is usually a small production and we love rotating pieces from our prop studio with our everyday slip porcelain from Australia. And we get just about every food magazine out there so—there may be a fine line between passion and addiction, but there just doesn’t seem to be a lot of free time for anything but food.