Search
categories
CB2 tweets

Entries in hint (20)

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a whirly tree

Supplies:
36 whirly candleholders
36 smart tealights
36 nails or screws, about 4” long
small glass pebbles, available at craft stores

Directions:
1. Using a soft pencil, plot a triangle on the wall about 36” wide at the base and 48” tall—starting about 18” from the floor.

2. Mark “X”s about 6” apart left to right—alternating their placement like bowling pins—and with about 8” between rows.

3. Screw or nail the hanging hardware deep enough for each candleholder to hang securely.

4. Hang whirly candleholders—each with about 1/4 cup of glass pebbles—and insert smart tealights.
hint: for a temporary display, use a painted mdf panel like we did for our bubble wreath.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a string lights tree

Supplies:
indoor string lights
lightweight ornaments
pencil and painter’s tape
hanging hardware, we used about 9 nails

Directions:
1. Using a pencil and painter’s tape as needed, mark out a tall triangle for the position of the tree, and a rectangle for the tree base.

2. Secure hanging hardware for the light strands—we used one nail at the top, a row of 6 along the bottom, and 2 for the base.

3. Test the light strand then weave it around the hardware—the simpler the better.

4. Hang a mix of lightweight ornaments on light sockets—or with ornament hooks—as desired.

hints:
1. Use the longest strand of lights available to avoid a bulky plug connection—also, avoid direct contact between the light bulbs and paper ornaments.
2. Use hanging hardware best suited for your wall—for best advice, check with your local hardware store.
3. Start a few inches off the floor—safely away from low objects or carpeting.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a frame tree

The basic geometric shapes of a Christmas tree is an elongated triangle for the tree, and a smaller rectangle for the tree trunk.

Keeping this in mind, look for visual elements that work well together and that can fill both spaces. Whether it’s framed art, pages pulled from favorite magazines or typography from a computer printer—anything goes, even holiday greeting cards friends and family.

Supplies from top to bottom, left to right:
float frame 7x9”
float frame square 11.5”
format acrylic cube
float frame 7x9”
hi-gloss white cube
float frame 7x9”
shiny frame 4x6”
float frame 7x9”
gallery frame narrow 4x6”
walnut box frame 5x8”

hint: Notice multiples of the float frame in the 7x9” size? This repetition gives structure to the tree while allowing individual elements to stand out in the crowd. Also, substitute a format clear cube for the hi-gloss white cube since it’s no longer available.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a chalkboard tree

Perhaps the easiest, most eco-friendly and versatile tree is one that’s sketched with chalk on a wall painted with chalkboard paint.

hint: think outside the box and embrace the holiday spirit by sketching a new tree every day…or, instead of an ornament party, host a design challenge and offer all types and colors of chalk to guests then vote for the favorite…or build a virtual tree adding elements on each of the 12 days of Christmas—the possibilities are as endless as your imagination.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Friday
Jul222011

how to: hang a rug as wall art

Much like tapestries from the Middle Ages—which were originally hung for better insulation in stone castles—hand-tufted rugs can enhance almost any wall with their colors, designs and texture.

big hint: once you’ve chosen the rug you’d like to hang, and the location or wall, visit your local hardware store for the best advice when shopping for screws, hardwood strips, and mounting hardware.

1. Cut two hardwood strips to a length proper for the rug you want to hang—just shy 1 or 2” from each edge—and miter one long edge of each strip at 60 degrees.

2. Attach one to the backside of the rug by screwing screws through the rug and with the miter in a similar position as shown. For best results, use a metal strip across the front to keep screws from pulling through the rug. If you’d prefer not to disturb the look of the rug design, consider smaller, flat metal pieces. They can be square, or round washers which can be painted to blend with the rug design. Just make sure they’re larger than the screw heads so they’ll stop them from pulling through.

3. Test the attachment of the rug to the strip by holding it aloft—without support for the weight of the rug—to ensure it’s well attached.

4. Next measure the location for a second wood strip to the wall in the correct location. Mount it with the miter opposite the rug-mounted strip as similarly shown.

5. Last, carefully ‘install’ the rug by positioning the strips so the mitered edges match yin for yang. Together, in profile, the two strips will create an elongated rectangle and ultimately the weight of the rug is supported by the strip mounted to the wall. This is known as a French cleat.