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Entries in holiday (63)

Wednesday
Dec042013

holiday favorites: sandra

jack black candleholder
whoever would have thought
opaque matte black glass would be so great looking!? plus the style is modern whimsical—reinvented Colonial-era candle holders from
a classic children’s story, simply brilliant!
stelton press coffee maker
chilly Sunday mornings there’s nothing better than a full pot of hot, black coffee—in the timeless Stelton design it’s definitely on my wish list.
pinch bowls
shiny pretty sparkly things—all year long.

Tuesday
Dec032013

watch: gold

Friday
Sep202013

the novogratz in the berkshires

A sneak peek of The Novogratz Holiday Collection
With colorful bold modern pieces combined with vintage finds they’ve gathered, Robert and Cortney Novogratz transform their New England country home every Christmas. Designed exclusively for CB2, the Novogratz Holiday Collection celebrates our favorites—we hope you enjoy this sneak peek and check out the full collection soon at cb2.com!

What do the holidays mean the most to you?
Family.

Robert comes from a big family and ours obviously is too—seven in each—so gathering together for celebrations means a lot of family, friends, good food and fun.

Where’s your favorite place to gather for the holidays?
Wherever we can! Since there are so many of us, our country house in the Berkshires is perfect—we’ve come a very long way since our first tiny apartment when we used folding tray tables for dining.

Decorating the house for the holidays adds visual memories—and we enjoy creating new ones by taking elements of the past into the future. Raw materials like clear acrylic, brass and mirrors—all from the 70s when we were growing up. The mirrored disco gnome is surely the epitome—it’s a trippy ode to the era.

You also bring in elements of antiques…
As much as we can—we love reworking antique pieces and the inspiration they give us. For example, the frame of the acrylic trunk recalls heavy-duty steamer trunks, the ram’s head references iconic taxidermy, and the deuce bed was inspired by “the one that got away” at the Paris flea market.

…and playful elements that remind us of the circus.
When our families and all of our friends are together—it is a circus! The lucky 7 helps create the mood—as well as the flechette dart board which does double-duty by entertaining the kids… and the adults!

How do you keep traditions with so much going on?
Again, with lots of visual cues—like a traditional pattern done in a new way as a brightly colored, over-sized scale on the mod plaid rug.

The acrylic trunk reminds us of the many travels our ancestors experienced to get us where we are today—and the many travels we’ve shared as a large family around the world. Today we use it to organize just about any type of “stuff” we’ve collected along the way.

Tell us about your wreath.
Traditions start by introducing something meaningful and repeating it year after year—so we started a new one by hanging the inner peace wreath on the front door. The modern combination of the twinkling lights with the rustic twigs strikes just the right contrast—and we love sharing and welcoming friends and family with this message since it speaks from our hearts.

Thursday
Jul042013

independence day, 2013

photo by: aa7aeHave a safe and very happy 4th of July!

Monday
Nov262012

redefined: the wreath

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. http://www.cngcoins.com [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC-BY-SA-2.5], via Wikimedia Commons Laurel wreaths date back to Greek mythology— when Daphne, the object of Apollo’s affections, was turned into a laurel tree, he wove its leaves into a headpiece to console himself.

Being a skilled gamesman, tournament winners were awarded crowns of laurel to show their worthiness by bequeathing Apollo’s adornment upon them.

Soon, wreaths of laurel or olive branches became a symbol of honor—awarded to Olympic athletes, battle warriors, eventually as
a standard, stately emblem—and in Roman times, noblemen wore them in a similar vein, or vanity.

Eventually the wreath was closed to form a complete circle—symbolizing eternity—and was used on a greater variety of occasions. Today, not only are wreaths used as year-round decorations, each has a personality all its own—below are just four examples which started with a basic wire wreath form.

Note: due to stronger than anticipated sales, unfortunately the wire wreath from is sold out. We apologize for the inconvenience and hope these projects inspire alternative decorating ideas for the Holidays.