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Entries in mirrors (4)

Friday
Dec132013

oh gnome we did!

How did the Novogratz’ disco gnome go from shelf size to larger-than…”life-size”? First, we contacted Daddy-O Productions in Brooklyn—who specialize in…extra large disco gnomes…?

To create the core, a small model gnome was laser scanned creating a wire frame rendering. This drawing was scaled up to the 6’ super size, then sliced into 4” thick layers—creating a virtual gnome layer cake.

The slices were then cut out of 4” thick, 1.5lb Styrofoam bead board using a computer-guided CNC router. Next, the contoured layers were stacked into the rough form of a blank gnome which was then hand-carved into their final, smooth shape—requiring about 24 man-hours to sculpt each one.

Now the hard part—mirroring the gnomes. To reduce breakage, chipping and weight, 1/8” thick acrylic mirror was used instead of glass mirrors.

Each gnome required about 6200 mirrors in 4 basic shapes—mostly 7/8” square, then trapezoid, rectangle and triangle to fit smaller spots. Since there are 5 gnomes, the +35,000 tiles were cut using a special industrial saw—which can cut almost all of them at once.

About half the square shapes were then individually shaped to fit the complex contours of the gnomes and—using 100% silicone and industrial grade hot glue—it took another 75 man-hours to attach the mirrors. That’s three people, about 4 days, to complete just one.

Through Christmas Eve, look for a super disco gnome at these CB2 locations: Eastside New York (shown above right), Union Square, West Hollywood, Lincoln Park, and South Beach Miami.

Tuesday
Jun222010

in multiples: mirrors

Similar to assembly lines from the industrial revolution, repetition of the same object is synonymous with modern. Simple shapes create a geometry and attract the eye because of their linear flow.

To create drama, mirrors in multiples will give the biggest bang for the buck—not only do they enhance the energy in a room, they visually increase space and light.

Wednesday
Apr072010

material world: mirrors

Calm water was most likely the first source of one’s reflection–which eventually led to narcissism named after the Greek god Narcissus.

Over time, many advances were made in the development of mirrors which led to today’s pristine versions. If you’ve ever seen dark, spotty antique mirrors, imagine what crude reflections the Romans saw from blown glass coated with molten lead.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/91829349@N00/2833711420/Venice became a center of mirror production in the 1500s using new techniques based on its glass-making expertise. Not long after, owning them became a luxury and status symbol which helps explain the decadent Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles.

Obviously they’re one of the most reliable ways of making a room appear larger. In the 70s however, mirrors were a literal reflection of disco and Glam Rock as their floor to ceiling sparkle overwhelmed many a sunken living room. For a modern look to increase space visually, consider infinity mirrors.

It’s no surprise that original Feng Shui beliefs were that mirrors related to the element of water and can increase or shift energy flow. In recent decades, proper placement in Western homes became just as relevant as yoga and green teas.

Today, “spy” mirrors—convex glass reflecting a wider area than flat glass—are most often used for safely allowing a peak around a corner. But they’re a whimsical touch when placed in an eclectic, sophisticated room.

Wednesday
Oct072009

what goes around

taxi and mop shop DSC08540to market DSC09538best loaded DSC08993
Traffic as we know it is a mix of motorcycles, cars, trucks and buses. In India, it’s all that and more including tractors, camel drawn carts, auto rickshaws, pedestrians and sacred animals.

Here bicycles are a vital tool to fulfill ones’ livelihood—an elemental, low-tech solution to a myriad of needs. Literally thousands of bikes share the road with  all of the above transporting workers to work, foods to markets, or materials and goods to factories.

It was inspirational to see bicycles transporting recyclables and a sistern to collect rain water. The mindset of the culture is amazingly resourceful so just about everything gets reused—or used sparingly.

Some of these very bicycle tires have been selected and repurposed as spoke mirrors for CB2. Each is one of a kind and the iconic engineering mixes great with old or new interiors.

recycling
Sistern DSC09120