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Friday
Dec052014

domino pick: duke stainless cocktail shaker

The editors at Domino magazine scoop their top CB2 finds for holiday decor, parties and giving—check out all Domino picks on cb2.com!

Managing Editor Brittany Chevalier’s pick:
duke stainless cocktail shaker Domino Magazine Managing Editor
Brittany Chevalier

While the holidays are filled with the aroma of peppermint and pinecones, I prefer my cocktails to stay sweet and fruity with the help of my new cocktail shaker.

Entertaining extraordinaire and blogger, Camille Styles, created the quintessential party libation—the Hibiscus Tea Fizz—which is perfect for this soiree season.

Check out her new book, Entertaining: Inspired Gatherings & Effortless Style for more style tips and recipes!

Ingredients:
1 750 ml bottle sparkling wine, Champagne or prosecco
1 C vodka
½ C honey
2 hibiscus-flavored tea bags
24 blackberries, fresh
Makes 8 cocktails

Directions:
1. In a pitcher, combine the vodka and tea bags. Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours and then discard the tea bags. Refrigerate the tea-infused vodka until cold.

2. For each cocktail, muddle 2 blackberries with 1 or 2 teaspoons honey in a cocktail shaker—make it more or less sweet based on preference—add 1 ounce tea-infused vodka and 1 teaspoon cold water, then shake vigorously for 30 seconds.

3. Strain into a flute to the halfway mark then fill the glass with sparkling wine, Champagne or prosecco. Garnish with a blackberry and serve.


















Image and recipe borrowed from Entertaining: Inspired Gatherings & Effortless Style

Wednesday
Nov262014

designer profile: gere kavanaugh

photo courtesy of: Nancy Louise Jones Where was your favorite place to live?
Oh I think everyplace I’ve live in I’ve loved—but
I like Los Angeles right now the best.

What’s your favorite room in your home?
That’s an easy question—it’s the whole house because I’ve worked hard on it and I’m still picking it up, always moving things things around. You have another idea or something looks different when it’s next to a different object or color or texture—so I’m always making what
I call still-lifes around the house.

What is your personal decorating style?
I don’t decorate. It’s a very simple but very direct and very colorful style.

Do you have one low budget decorating tip?
Paint.

What’s your favorite possession?
My tea cups—about half of the collection are glazed in colors or painted and the other half are all white. When you’re drinking tea, tea has many different colors—and even in the green and black varieties—I like being able to see all those colors and the only way is to drink it in a white cup.

What was/is your biggest indulgence?
Sweaters and yarns—I love texture so often I’ll buy skeins of yarns just because I’m attracted to them.

What one item do you wish you owned?
I’d love to own a watermelon tourmaline—if you get one of the oblong crystal shapes, it goes from a reddish watermelon color to green. I saw one once in Central America and never since.

What are your interests outside of design?
I have so many! Cooking, reading, traveling, visiting museums—just living—listening to intelligent people give lectures but it all feeds back into my design living.

What are your sources of inspiration?
Getting up in the morning and walking out into the world. I believe a designer’s job is to look— so I’m always looking because you never know what will strike you as inspiration or what you can file away to reference or build upon later.

Form vs. function?
That’s a funny one—I also collect industrial things like funnels, graters… their function is so simple and the designs are no nonsense, honest. I think they go hand in hand because they’re so honest.

In your opinion, what is the best designed item of all time?
There are so many things—mainly it’s the basics like the needle, the pencil, paper clips, Ziploc┬« Bags.

What’s the best career advice you ever received? Ever gave?
Again, it’s very simple—I had a teacher who once said the most important thing you could have was curiosity. It makes you dig and think—whether you’re an artist, a musician or a scientist—it’s how I live every day.

To see all of Gere’s current works for CB2, go here.

Friday
Nov212014

domino pick: fringe with benefits throw

The editors at Domino magazine scoop their top CB2 finds for holiday decor, parties and giving—check out all Domino picks on cb2.com!

Fashion Editor Amanda Thompson’s pick:
fringe with benefits throw Domino Magazine Fashion Editor
Amanda Thompson

An amazing way to warm up any room this holiday season—give this textured, cozy throw as a gift to friends or family, or keep it for yourself!

Personally, I would pair this throw with neutral colored pieces to brighten up any space, as well as use it to balance any brightly-colored room.  Use it in living room for chilly nights, draped on a sofa arm, or as a throw for the foot of bed.

The best way to stay warm in the cold winter months, this throw can also transition into spring and summer months as a picnic blanket.

Monday
Sep222014

watch: geometrics

Friday
Sep192014

redefined: das beer can

photo by: LaModaLisa photo by: cgrutt

The idea of drinking beer from something other than a ceramic stein or glass mug poured from the tap at the local public house or pub, was first considered over 100 years ago in 1909. Like many innovations, the technology existed but it took about 25 years—and the repeal of Prohibition—for the modest beer can to catch on.

In 1933, the first canned ale was tested in Virginia—needless to say, consumers welcomed the change which paved the way for easy-to-transport, easy-to-store, disposable cans. Initially made of steel with a flat top, they required a sharp opener, or church key, to pierce triangular openings—one to drink from, and another on the opposite side which allowed air into the can to improve the pour out.

The evolution to lightweight aluminum was inevitable due to the drawbacks of steel—not only was a lining required to protect the contents, steel is inherently prone to rust and the heavier weight meant transportation costs were higher than necessary.

photo by: Mark photo by: Amara

photo by: mark gallagher photo by: Paul Flannery

Easy-to-use pull tabs replaced the need to keep an opener handy—but they also heralded an increase in emergency room visits as the sharp edges cut fingers and feet or, in worst-case scenarios, drinkers choked on the tab they’d kept safe in the can. Today, wide mouth openings created by attached tabs are the norm—but as small brews flourish, the capped bottle is seeing a revival.

In the meantime, das can reminds us of modest old-school beers—not to mention beer can collections and Oktoberfest which starts this weekend—Zum Wohl!

photo by: Steve Jurvetson