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Entries in ornament (9)

Friday
Nov092012

redefined: origami

The art of folding paper—ori, folding and gami, paper—dates to the 1600s and the most widely known or replicated subject is the crane.

Traditional origami starts with a square piece of paper—usually handmade or hand-printed—and does not allow for cutting or gluing. Intricate designs can be made by using many basic, small folds—or more simple designs are created in high volume for a more intense display.

The legend is that if you create 1000 origami cranes, a wish will be granted by them. Some believe that the crane—like the dragon and tortoise—is a holy creature that lives for a thousand years, hence the quantity, their popularity and mysticism as each folded paper crane represents one year of its life.

Much like paper cranes given as wedding or baby gifts, origami ornaments are full of good wishes, prosperity, health and happiness—powerfully meaningful and charming all year long.

photo courtesy of: Dominic’s pics

Note: scale of ornaments to each other is not actual.

Friday
Nov112011

how to: make a wire ornament wreath

Supplies:
30 wire ornaments—15 blue, 15 green
15” diameter white wire frame
spool of aluminum wire
wire cutters

Directions:
1. Loop aluminum wire through a green finial ornament and attach to the first ring of the white wire frame. Twist and cut wire, then repeat by attaching the ornament to the third ring.
2. Alternate a blue spiral ornament and attach—same as above—to the second and fourth ring of the white wire frame.
3. Repeat alternating colors until the ring is full.
4. Hang by securing final wreath to a hanging ribbon or on a wreath holder.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a string lights tree

Supplies:
indoor string lights
lightweight ornaments
pencil and painter’s tape
hanging hardware, we used about 9 nails

Directions:
1. Using a pencil and painter’s tape as needed, mark out a tall triangle for the position of the tree, and a rectangle for the tree base.

2. Secure hanging hardware for the light strands—we used one nail at the top, a row of 6 along the bottom, and 2 for the base.

3. Test the light strand then weave it around the hardware—the simpler the better.

4. Hang a mix of lightweight ornaments on light sockets—or with ornament hooks—as desired.

hints:
1. Use the longest strand of lights available to avoid a bulky plug connection—also, avoid direct contact between the light bulbs and paper ornaments.
2. Use hanging hardware best suited for your wall—for best advice, check with your local hardware store.
3. Start a few inches off the floor—safely away from low objects or carpeting.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a frame tree

The basic geometric shapes of a Christmas tree is an elongated triangle for the tree, and a smaller rectangle for the tree trunk.

Keeping this in mind, look for visual elements that work well together and that can fill both spaces. Whether it’s framed art, pages pulled from favorite magazines or typography from a computer printer—anything goes, even holiday greeting cards friends and family.

Supplies from top to bottom, left to right:
float frame 7x9”
float frame square 11.5”
format acrylic cube
float frame 7x9”
hi-gloss white cube
float frame 7x9”
shiny frame 4x6”
float frame 7x9”
gallery frame narrow 4x6”
walnut box frame 5x8”

hint: Notice multiples of the float frame in the 7x9” size? This repetition gives structure to the tree while allowing individual elements to stand out in the crowd. Also, substitute a format clear cube for the hi-gloss white cube since it’s no longer available.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree

Thursday
Oct202011

how to: create a chalkboard tree

Perhaps the easiest, most eco-friendly and versatile tree is one that’s sketched with chalk on a wall painted with chalkboard paint.

hint: think outside the box and embrace the holiday spirit by sketching a new tree every day…or, instead of an ornament party, host a design challenge and offer all types and colors of chalk to guests then vote for the favorite…or build a virtual tree adding elements on each of the 12 days of Christmas—the possibilities are as endless as your imagination.

Thanks to marcus, prop stylist on this CB2 catalog shoot.

file under: DIY, alternative tree