Search
categories
CB2 tweets

Entries in reclaimed (6)

Monday
Sep102012

how it's made: defy bags bowery tote

With characteristic fatigue—recalling anecdotes from a defining chapter in our nation’s history—authentic military tent canvas is expertly upcycled by Chicago based Defy Bags® for more action.

First and last used in World War II, the material is given an organic bath to remove decades of old must and dust. Pieces are then laid out for pattern cutting—all under the watchful eyes of expert craftspeople.

From the 100 year-old Horween Leather Company, Latigo leather pieces—supple, sturdy cattle hide which is a staple of saddlery and military gear—are used to make the straps and front pocket of the bag. The leather is tanned using centuries old techniques then pattern-cut and stitched to the
bowery tote—all by hand.

One of a Finds original works are offered one time only as a limited edition for collectors and enthusiasts—this hand-crafted bag of repurposed material has a release of 100.

Monday
Aug062012

how it's made: dondra bed

Much of the wood used to make the dondra bed is reclaimed from old teak doors, painted windows and doors, beams or flooring from inside old houses that are no longer usable or have been replaced.

Purchased as raw materials by weight, it’s often in a wide range of quality—broken/split, with nail holes, including nails, etc.

While the unusable pieces are discarded, the bulk of the lot is sorted, pieces are laminated together, holes filled with a mix of glue and wood, and finished by sanding and lacquer coating.

Friday
Jul012011

one of a finds: wood tops

Since a picture speaks a thousand words in any language, the following tell the back story of how we got from there to here—the making of a set of five wood tops.

The Indian Railways, or IR, is one of the largest networks in the world. Its nearly 1.6 million employees transport 20 million passengers over almost 40,000 miles of tracks through nearly 7,000 stations—everyday.

Railroad ties, or “sleepers”, are approximately 40-50 years old and are being replaced with newer concrete versions. Once the ties are collected, the outer surface is milled to get to the core sal wood.

Traditionally used to play the Indian street game bambaram, five distinct top forms are lathed to create the appearance of the classic toys. With naturally occurring wood checks and markings, each of these decorative objects literally has its own unique spin. Measuring 4-6” long, they come wrapped in muslin and packed in a galvanized metal box.

One of a Finds original works are offered one time only as a limited edition for collectors and enthusiasts—the sal wood tops have a fall 2011 release of 744 boxed sets.

Note: this one of a find will be available early September.

Wednesday
Sep292010

one of a finds: chop chop table

Using wood that’s harvested within the Chicago metro area—due to the effects of nature such as age, wind or storm damage—chop chop not only reduces the demand on our nation’s forests, they’re fabricated locally thereby minimizing the carbon footprint between the source, mill and production.

Designer Paul Pettigrew, Studio Associate Professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology College of Architecture, pursued this project in response to a surplus of felled ash trees in our urban forests.

Collaborating with Horigan Urban Forest Products, each piece is stripped of its bark and squared into rectangular logs. Then they’re kiln-dried, sanded, oiled, and protective feet are added.

The natural variations in grain, dimension and color of trees that define the urban forest mean each table is unique. Kiln-dried to reduce moisture content, wood checks (ie. splits or cracks) may appear as the wood acclimates to its environment—expands and/or contracts—but they enhance each table’s special character without affecting its structural integrity.

Congratulations to Horigan Products’ co-founders Erika and Bruce Horigan, who’ve been recognized by the Illinois Arborist Association for advancing the cause of wood recycling and by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the Illinois Waste Management and Research Center for significant achievements in protecting the environment.

harvesting a damaged treecut logs ready for milling
raw tables drying in a kiln

Tuesday
Sep072010

the making of: darjeeling

Since a picture speaks a thousand words in any language, and a “handmade” description doesn’t tell the whole story, the following detail the making of a darjeeling dining table—completely by hand.

The Indian Railways, or IR, is one of the largest networks in the world. Its nearly 1.6 million employees transport 20 million passengers over almost 40,000 miles of tracks through nearly 7,000 stations—everyday.

Railroad ties, or “sleepers”, are approximately 40-50 years old and are being replaced with newer concrete versions.

To make a tabletop, reclaimed ties are planed down to the inner core and joined together in a puzzle fashion. Exposed damage and loose wood is marked, chiseled out, and replaced with smaller pieces.

Tabletops are then re-sanded and the process repeated where gaps appear. Fine gaps are filled with a mixture of blackened glue and sawdust.

Steel T-bar and square tubes are welded together to create the leg assembly and tabletop support. The final finishing stages include grinding the welding for a smoother finish.