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Entries in self-adhesive (2)

Friday
Jul032015

how to: create linear patterned wallpaper

Materials:
DIY self-adhesive wallpaper
pencil
paint tray
drop cloth
level
large ruler
triangle
4” foam paint roller
painter’s tape, sensitive
base paint, as desired
metallic paint, as desired





Directions:
1. Speak with a CB2 sales associate or use the online calculator to determine the quantity of
DIY self-adhesive wallpaper needed to cover the desired area. Next, following the instructions on the packaging, prepare the desired surface and apply the wallpaper.

2. Paint the entire area of wallpaper with a base/background color, then let it dry for at least
24 hours. We used Benjamin Moore eggshell finish paint, gray blue BM-1501.

3. Using the dimensions of the desired wall, sketch the design or draw it on a computer. For best results, print a test sheet to scale to judge the final appearance of the design.
Hint: basing the design on 90 and 45 degree angles will make it easier to create.
Hint hint: the width and quantity of lines will determine if the pattern looks heavy and busy or light and airy—we used 2” wide painters tape for the wider lines alternating with 1/4” thin lines.

4. To translate the design, we started by measuring and pencil-drawing the first diagonal line that cuts across the entire wall and which will anchor the overall design. From the top left hand corner, create a 45 degree angle using a rafter angle square and a large level. Adhere and press the painters tape against this line, then mark off a 1/4” from its edge and continue marking off the middle diagonal section line by line.
Hint: for second, third and subsequent lines, make small pencil dots to measure them out—those markings will be less visible than penciling solid lines.
Hint hint: If the measurements don’t work out perfectly, any small differences likely won’t be seen. However, to be more exact, adjust the width of the stripes on the last section—a 1/4” to 1/2” difference shouldn’t be visible to the eye.

5. Measure, mark and tape all subsequent angles and lines. Once the complete pattern has been translated to the wall, fill the negative spaces with painters tape but exposing the 1/4” lines to be painted.
Hint: by pressing firmly on all edges, a good seal will be created which will prevent paint from bleeding under the tape—or, for an exceptionally crisp line, speak with a paint specialist about a clear glaze application along the edges of the tape.

6. Once the wall is completely taped, paint the exposed lines with a small foam roller—we used a metallic silver made by Modern Masters, ME 150, applied in 3 light coats with 2 hours of drying time between each coat.

7. Let the paint cure for 24 hours, then spot check to make sure it’s dry to the touch before removing the tape—and before placing anything on it.

Friday
Jan242014

how to: paint DIY self-adhesive wallpaper

Supplies:
pencil and paper
interior latex paint, as desired
paint rollers, for latex paint
Japanese calligraphy ink, for artwork
paint trays, as needed

Directions:
1. To get started, use the handy calculator online to determine the number of
DIY self-adhesive wallpaper rolls needed.

2. For best results, apply the peel-stick paper to surfaces that have been primed and painted with an eggshell, satin or semi-gloss interior paint. Installation should go quickly since the paper is blank—no patterns to line-up.

3. For the diy/artwork, interior latex paints work just fine if a specific background color is preferred—simply paint the wallpaper the same as any other wall/surface.

hint: depending on the color or shade, it may require two coats to achieve an even, blank canvas.

4. To create a composition, sketch pattern/drawing ideas on paper. Once that’s ready, and after the base coat is completely dry, lightly sketch it out on the wall with pencil—we found it’s easier to follow the pattern this way.

hint: after experimenting with different paints, we found that Japanese calligraphy ink is the perfect consistency and has a really dramatic, rich color—this is what was used for the catalog shot shown.

hint hint: if a specific paint color is preferred for the actual pattern or artwork—and latex or acrylic paints are chosen—it will just need to be watered down to a consistency close to milk to help brush flow. Using a latex or acrylic paint may require two or more coats to get the lines more opaque than transparent—testing on a small swatch is recommended for best results.

5. To paint the broad, black lines we used a 2” wide house painting brush. The trick to getting a nice, full, energetic loop is to not stop in the middle of a loop—even if your brush runs out of paint, it’s better to go back and do a second coat to make the lines opaque.

6. Optional: lastly, the drips were a happy accident so we let them happen naturally—then added more for dramatic effect.