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Entries in wallpaper (3)

Thursday
Jul032014

how to: create paint-bombed wallpaper 

Supplies: 
DYI self-adhesive wallpaper
wall paint
acrylic faux glaze liquid
sponges
bowl of water
containers for paint mixtures
drop cloth
rubber gloves
scissors
rubber bands

Directions:
1. Measure and cut sections of wallpaper that will fit the wall that you want to cover.
hint: be sure to mark which section goes where so the pattern flows accordingly.

2. To avoid paint drippings in the pattern, clear a large area of the floor or set up a long table and cover either with a drop cloth to best contain the liquids—then lay flat a section of wallpaper, DIY side up.
hint: the artwork we created is per panel so if a matching pattern is desired, use painters tape on the backside and join panels to create a mural effect.

3. We chose a look that required round/ball-shaped sponges. If this type isn’t readily available, or if another shape is desired, one can be made with a few scissor snips and rubber bands. For our project, we cut off about a third of the end of the sponge and formed the large part of the sponge into a ball by folding corners back and under, securing it with a rubber band so it stayed in a ball shape. Cut the remainder in half to use as secondary tools.
hint: a damp sponge is easier to shape than a dry one—just dip, squeeze, and then form it.
hint hint: if the sponge is large enough, simply use scissors to cut a ball, or other shape out of it.

4. Pour about a 1/2 cup of each paint color into separate containers. Ultimately the consistency of the paint mixture should be similar to milk so add about 1/4 cup of faux glaze liquid and a little water
hint: the glaze is optional but we found it was helpful to thin the color without making it too watery.
hint hint: disposable plates worked well as containers for the paint since they allowed the sponges to easily absorb the paint mixture and clean up took no time.

5. Immerse the sponge ball in water and give it a couple squeezes to make sure it’s saturated. Dip the end of the sponge into the paint mixture and with a little force, pounce the sponge against the wallpaper to achieve the paint-bombed/splatter effect.
hint: test the technique on scrap paper to know how much force is needed.

6. Cover the wallpaper with a desired pattern and layering colors as desired, then use a clean sponge to pick up any excess paint mixture.

7. Allow the painted wallpaper to dry for a full 48 hours—initially the paint may be fragile and easy to scratch off, this will allow it to cure fully and be more stable.
hint: set up a fan on low to help air circulate and speed the drying process.

8. Lastly, apply the self-adhesive wallpaper per the enclosed directions.
hint: to avoid cracking the paint, bend the paper as little as possible when peeling/adhering.

Friday
Jan242014

how to: paint DIY self-adhesive wallpaper

Supplies:
pencil and paper
interior latex paint, as desired
paint rollers, for latex paint
Japanese calligraphy ink, for artwork
paint trays, as needed

Directions:
1. To get started, use the handy calculator online to determine the number of
DIY self-adhesive wallpaper rolls needed.

2. For best results, apply the peel-stick paper to surfaces that have been primed and painted with an eggshell, satin or semi-gloss interior paint. Installation should go quickly since the paper is blank—no patterns to line-up.

3. For the diy/artwork, interior latex paints work just fine if a specific background color is preferred—simply paint the wallpaper the same as any other wall/surface.

hint: depending on the color or shade, it may require two coats to achieve an even, blank canvas.

4. To create a composition, sketch pattern/drawing ideas on paper. Once that’s ready, and after the base coat is completely dry, lightly sketch it out on the wall with pencil—we found it’s easier to follow the pattern this way.

hint: after experimenting with different paints, we found that Japanese calligraphy ink is the perfect consistency and has a really dramatic, rich color—this is what was used for the catalog shot shown.

hint hint: if a specific paint color is preferred for the actual pattern or artwork—and latex or acrylic paints are chosen—it will just need to be watered down to a consistency close to milk to help brush flow. Using a latex or acrylic paint may require two or more coats to get the lines more opaque than transparent—testing on a small swatch is recommended for best results.

5. To paint the broad, black lines we used a 2” wide house painting brush. The trick to getting a nice, full, energetic loop is to not stop in the middle of a loop—even if your brush runs out of paint, it’s better to go back and do a second coat to make the lines opaque.

6. Optional: lastly, the drips were a happy accident so we let them happen naturally—then added more for dramatic effect.

Friday
Jan172014

introducing: wallpaper

It’s been many months in the making and many samples in the process—but all of us at CB2 are thrilled to debut our first collection of wallpaper February 1st.

What began by asking ourselves “how can we enhance a customer’s home beyond furniture, accessories and textiles?” —came in the answer of a wallpaper collection including both permanent and removable papers, featuring designs with a thoroughly modern aesthetic.

By collaborating with two of our favorite artists—Noël Ashby and Ben Holiday —we’re looking forward to sharing the potential decorating possibilities with both home owners and renters—and getting to work on the next collection!

Whether graphic or photographic, here are snippets of their inspiration:

Noël Ashby:
All of my work starts as a sketch of something I’ve seen, words that create strong visuals, or a snippet of something—fabric, paper, etc., whose shape takes on personality to me.

From there I collage, paint, Photoshop, bump shapes up against lines, cut things apart—anything to get to the final pattern that captures that which first caught my interest. It becomes a story, a tale to tell.

Forest for the trees—I love this expression. Simply put, individual trees are lost in creating the overall texture of a forest.

For the crumpled trees pattern, I used my initial sketches—and a photocopier—to create a look that, in vast repetition, creates a forest of crumpled tress.



Ben Holiday:
My inspiration was the delicately designed facade—with vivid reflections, soft shadows—and linear fire escapes as a calm against the bustle of New York City.

I’m drawn to Mies van der Rohe’s clean lines and pioneering minimalism; Tom Ford’s eye for mixing, texturing and layering; Brancusi’s ultra stylized style; and Van Gogh’s ability to paint colors in any lighting.

Overall, I love clean lines, intriguing colors, cool patterns, and engaging compositions—to create this image, I used a digital slr camera plus image manipulation in Photoshop.

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Be one of the first to view the full collection February 1st by visiting cb2.com.