Search
categories
CB2 tweets

Entries in weaving (6)

Monday
Aug252014

how it's made: handwoven recycled sari rugs

The making of the handwoven recycled sari rugs and runners begins at the core of the rug—the vibrant silk fibers which come from the sari manufacturing industry. This thriving business in India reflects the richness of its culture—and its resourcefulness as it leaves little to waste.

In Bangalore, located in south India, remnants of sarees are sold to companies who segregate it as per the potential use of the materials and a buyer’s needs—and while sarees are made in various parts of India, these lots of remnants are usually a mix of all colors which allows for specific shade requirements to be met in the segregation process.

A control sample helps to guide the color separator and the remainder of the fibers are used to make the yarns of mixed colors—so just about everything is used in the end.

Once the fibers are well organized, it’s then handspun into yarn—the results of this process are yarns with varying thicknesses at random places. In order to have a level of consistency, all the highly uneven count is removed as well as any drastic shade changes.

When enough fibers are gathered and yarn spun, the weaving process begins on a regular vertical loom which is typically used to weave dhurrie or hand-knotted rugs.

During the weaving process, rows of yarns are pressed together using a wooden comb which makes the weaving tighter and more durable.

To secure the weaving and complete the look, the same yarns are used to hand-stitch all of the edges and a final washing completes the process.

Wednesday
Jul302014

fall favorites: april

tangled web macrame wall hanging
love this for added texture in a space—it could easily work on a wall or as a room divider.
ground control jute rug
a nice neutral rug with some added pops of orange for a more masculine room.
bell white flush mount lamp
I’m going to be putting these down
my hallway to add a little warm metallic to the otherwise white space.

Thanks to april, senior catalog merchandising manager.

Friday
May112012

on the road: india 4.2012

Friday
Jul222011

how to: hang a rug as wall art

Much like tapestries from the Middle Ages—which were originally hung for better insulation in stone castles—hand-tufted rugs can enhance almost any wall with their colors, designs and texture.

big hint: once you’ve chosen the rug you’d like to hang, and the location or wall, visit your local hardware store for the best advice when shopping for screws, hardwood strips, and mounting hardware.

1. Cut two hardwood strips to a length proper for the rug you want to hang—just shy 1 or 2” from each edge—and miter one long edge of each strip at 60 degrees.

2. Attach one to the backside of the rug by screwing screws through the rug and with the miter in a similar position as shown. For best results, use a metal strip across the front to keep screws from pulling through the rug. If you’d prefer not to disturb the look of the rug design, consider smaller, flat metal pieces. They can be square, or round washers which can be painted to blend with the rug design. Just make sure they’re larger than the screw heads so they’ll stop them from pulling through.

3. Test the attachment of the rug to the strip by holding it aloft—without support for the weight of the rug—to ensure it’s well attached.

4. Next measure the location for a second wood strip to the wall in the correct location. Mount it with the miter opposite the rug-mounted strip as similarly shown.

5. Last, carefully ‘install’ the rug by positioning the strips so the mitered edges match yin for yang. Together, in profile, the two strips will create an elongated rectangle and ultimately the weight of the rug is supported by the strip mounted to the wall. This is known as a French cleat.

Thursday
Jul212011

the making of: hemp rugs

The fine finished hemp rug can be deceiving—it’s actually made completely by hand from raw hemp fibers.

Its tonal burnished brown effect is achieved with a blend of unbleached, undyed hemp fibers that yield a warm variegation depending on when they were harvested.

Yarns are woven and handknotted in a labor-intensive process that can take one week to create one rug.

Below are the step by step processes including a final wash that lends a subtle sheen and amazing softness.

Prepping natural yarns for weaving by making smaller bunches from the large mill bunches.

Since hemp is a strong and rough yarn in its natural state, the yarns are set on a machine for washing which will remove smaller fibers making it softer, cleaner and neater.

Weaving the rugs.

Washing the woven rugs to further soften the final version.

Finishing stages of trimming the pile and edges.