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Entries in wood (13)

Thursday
Jun032010

watch: split logs

Piles of split logs in these racks and fire pits create one-of-a-kind sculptures highlighting the natural beauty of raw wood.  Repetition is key, not to mention the variety of color and texture of the different species.

All the reasons we love the darjeeling table which is made from reclaimed railroad ties. Each section has its own individual beauty which enhances the whole and makes it truly unique.

Wednesday
Jun022010

watch: wood

We’re always amazed when a trend hits all categories at the same time: home, fashion, movies… when was the last time you saw so many clogs?

Natural, chunky wood has been a refreshing change from dark wenge finishes we’ve seen these past few years. It’s a surefire way to bring nature indoors—to help us reconnect as we admire the beauty of each unique piece.

Obviously they aren’t created overnight so if we could ask for your patience, we hope you’ll be as excited as we are to introduce a one-of-a-find this July which was inspired by these stunning examples.

Wednesday
Aug052009

one of a finds: jain monk bowls

This exquisitely refined set of jain monk bowls is handmade in Rajasthan, India by the Kharadi muslims for use by the Shwetamber sect of Jain monks. The white-robed Jain monks take five ethical vows—this includes renouncing all wordly possessions, including their name—owning only these nine alms bowls presented to them by their followers. In a journey of humility, the monks travel on foot with only their nesting bowls, going door to door, village to village, seeking followers who fill them with food.

Now an almost extinct woodworking art practiced by only 30 families in the region, the begging bowls or “bhiksha patra” are lathed from local rohida wood, prized for its dense grain and strength. No wood is wasted, with each of the nine bowls scooped from the heart of the bowl before it.

Artisans apprentice for years to make these bowls by first making simple coasters and progressively improving their skill level once each has been mastered. In addition to the difficulty of carving a smaller bowl from the heart of a larger bowl, the walls are only 1/16-inch thin which further tests their skills.

As a continuation of their vow to renounce worldly possessions, when the bowls are no longer of use they are broken into pieces, buried and returned to the earth.

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