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Entries in wool (3)

Friday
Jul082011

the making of: tie dye rug

Above, hand-tufting and finishing the natural wool pile—the base of a tie-dye rug—then prepping the rug for dyeing.

After dyeing, rinsing, and blocking, a latex backing is added above. Below, four tie-dye rugs shown side by side—each unique in pattern and color variation—ready for inspection, wrapping and shipping.

Friday
Jan072011

the making of: dangerous liasons

Designed by Legendre+Rutter to pay homage to the 2009 theatre poster for the Canberra Repertory Society production of the 18th-century tale, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”; Chicago designer Lance Rutter’s original illustration and lettering achieved its rich coloration and detail with a unique process that included rendering every line with a brush pen and printing directly on bright red paper.

Hand-tufted—in reverse, then backed—using Indian and New Zealand wools, each dangerous liaisons rug takes approximately two days to produce. Execution of the design is a tribute to the talent of the craftsmen who interpret the original illustration into a tapestry using just six yarn colors.

To fully appreciate the drama of the design, contact your local hardware store for hardware to hang one on a wall as artwork.

Tuesday
Sep142010

the making of: shag rugs

‘Shag’ rugs refers to how they’re made but not what they’re made of. So like other carpets or rugs, basically any material that can be woven can be used—synthetic fibers like nylon or rayon, or natural fibers like cotton or wool.

from this, undyed woolen yarnsto this, a finished lounge shag rug

For centuries, the ‘original’ shag rug—the flokati—has been made of tangled goat’s wool in Greece. Traditionally made without dyes they’re notoriously known to be the natural, virgin hue of the wool. More recently however wool shags can be found in any color or mix of colors.

To make a shag rug, strands or yarns of material are loosely woven—horizontal weft through vertical warp yarns. In contrast, standard pile rugs are more tightly tufted, ie. yarns are ‘passed through’ a woven cloth backing, usually with more and thinner yarns per square inch making them more dense and crew-cut like.

Typically manufactured by making loops in the weaving process, shags yarns are then trimmed at a longish length, ie. creating a deep-pile, that gives the rug a lush and shaggy look. And when the weaving is completed, the warp yarns are cut from the loom and those vertical edges are finished.